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Press Release Images: Opportunity
30-Apr-2010
Mars Rover Sees Distant Crater Rims on Horizon
Spotlight
Endeavour on the Horizon, True Color
Endeavour on the Horizon

NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity used its panoramic camera (Pancam) to capture this view of the rim of Endeavour crater, the rover's destination in a multi-year traverse along the sandy Martian landscape. The image was taken during the 2,226 Martian day, or sol, of Opportunity's mission on Mars (April 28, 2010).

Endeavour is 21 kilometers (13 miles) in diameter, about 25 times wider than Victoria crater, the last major crater Opportunity visited. This image shows an outcrop of rocks at the foot of the rover and beyond these rocks rippled dunes, which are about 20 centimeters (8 inches) tall. The west rim of Endeavour, about 13 kilometers (8 miles) away, appears on the left on the horizon. The rim of smaller, more-distant Iazu crater, which is 7 kilometers (4 miles) in diameter and about 35 kilometers (22 miles) away, is on the far right. On the horizon in between is a blanket of material ejected from the impact that created Iazu crater, and darker features that are portions of the west and southwest rim of Endeavour.

Opportunity began a marathon from Victoria to Endeavour in September 2008 after spending two years exploring Victoria. The intended route, about 19 kilometers (12 miles) long, has headed south before turning east in order to bypass potentially hazardous sand ripples to the east, larger than the ripples in this image.

This approximately true-color view combines three exposures taken through filters admitting wavelengths of 750 nanometers, 530 nanometers and 430 nanometers.

Image Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech/Cornell University
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Full-Res (NASA's Planetary Photojournal)
Endeavour on the Horizon (False Color)
Endeavour on the Horizon (False Color)

NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity used its panoramic camera (Pancam) to capture this view of the rim of Endeavour crater, the rover's destination in a multi-year traverse along the sandy Martian landscape. The image was taken during the 2,226 Martian day, or sol, of Opportunity's mission on Mars (April 28, 2010).

Endeavour is 21 kilometers (13 miles) in diameter, about 25 times wider than Victoria crater, the last major crater Opportunity visited. This image shows an outcrop of rocks at the foot of the rover and beyond these rocks rippled dunes, which are about 20 centimeters (8 inches) tall. The west rim of Endeavour, about 13 kilometers (8 miles) away, appears on the left on the horizon. The rim of smaller, more-distant Iazu crater, which is 7 kilometers (4 miles) in diameter and about 35 kilometers (22 miles) away, is on the far right. On the horizon in between is a blanket of material ejected from the impact that created Iazu crater, and darker features that are portions of the west and southwest rim of Endeavour.

Opportunity began a marathon from Victoria to Endeavour in September 2008 after spending two years exploring Victoria. The intended route, about 19 kilometers (12 miles) long, has headed south before turning east in order to bypass potentially hazardous sand ripples to the east, larger than the ripples in this image.

This view is presented in false color, which is used to emphasize differences in surface materials. It combines three exposures taken through filters admitting wavelengths of 750 nanometers, 530 nanometers and 430 nanometers.

Image Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech/Cornell University
Browse Image | Medium (60 kB) | Large (3.4 MB)
Full-Res (NASA's Planetary Photojournal)
Endeavour on the Horizon (Context View)
Endeavour on the Horizon (Context View)

This image uses a view from the navigation camera on NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity to show context for a horizon shot by the rover's narrower-angle panoramic camera. The navigation camera exposures were taken during the 2,220th Martian day, or sol, of Opportunity's mission on Mars (April 22, 2010).

The horizon view from the panoramic camera, at http://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/catalog/PIA13081 and http://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/catalog/PIA13080, includes a portion of the rim of Endeavour crater, the rover's destination in a multi-year traverse along the sandy Martian landscape. Opportunity began a marathon from Victoria to Endeavour in September 2008 after spending two years exploring Victoria.

Image Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech/Cornell University
Browse Image | Medium Image (32 kB) | Large (3.4 MB)
Full-Res (NASA's Planetary Photojournal)
Orbital View of Opportunity's Region
Orbital View of Opportunity's Region

This view of an area about 140 kilometers (about 90 miles) wide in the Meridiani Planum region of Mars shows the region around NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity. Opportunity, in the seventh year of its exploration of Mars, is in the upper central portion of the image, on multi-year trek from Victoria crater toward the much larger Endeavour crater. In April 2010, Opportunity captured views of the rims of Endeavour crater and the more distant Iazu crater on the horizon to southeast from the rover. (See http://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/catalog/PIA13081 and http://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/catalog/PIA13080.) The rover's position relative to those craters is indicated here.

This view is a mosaic of daytime infrared images taken by the Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS) camera on NASA's Mars Odyssey orbiter. The THEMIS mosaic was prepared using JMARS (http://jmars.asu.edu), a software tool developed at Arizona State University for viewing and analyzing Mars data sets.

Image Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech/Arizona State University
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Full-Res (NASA's Planetary Photojournal)
Unlabeled
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