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Press Release Images: Opportunity
01-Sep-2011
NASA'S Mars Rover Opportunity Begins Study of Martian Crater
Press Release
Magnified View of Texture on Part of 'Tisdale 2' Rock
Magnified View of Texture on Part of "Tisdale 2" Rock

NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity used its microscopic imager to record this close-up view of texture on part of a rock informally named "Tisdale 2" on the western rim of Endeavour crater. The image was taken during the 2,694th Martian day, or sol, of Opportunity's work on Mars (Aug. 22, 2011).

The view covers an area about 3 centimeters (1.2 inches) across. It shows a texture called brecciated, with broken rock fragments fused together and embedded in matrix of this rock. The fragments are called clasts.

This image is of target "B," whose location on Tisdale 2 is indicated on image PIA14745.

Image Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech/Cornell/USGS

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Elevated Zinc and Bromine in Rock on Endeavour Rim
Elevated Zinc and Bromine in Rock on Endeavour Rim

This graphic presents information gained by examining part of the Martian rock called "Tisdale 2" with the alpha particle X-ray spectrometer on Mars rover Opportunity and comparing the composition measured there with compositions of other targets examined by Opportunity and its rover twin, Spirit.

The comparison targets are soil in Gusev crater, examined by Spirit; the relatively fresh basaltic rock Adirondack, examined by Spirit; the stony meteorite Marquette examined by Opportunity; and Gibraltar, an example of sulfate-rich bedrock examined by Opportunity. The target area on Tisdale 2, called "Timmins 1," contains elevated levels of bromine (Br), zinc (Zn), phosphorus (P), sulfur (S) and chlorine (Cl) relative to the non-sulfate-rich comparison rocks, and high levels of zinc and phosphorus relative to Gibraltar.

Image Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech/Cornell/Max Planck Institute/University of Guelph

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Locations of Microscopic Imager Observations on 'Tisdale 2'
Locations of Microscopic Imager Observations on 'Tisdale 2'

This image overlays "thumbnail" images taken by the Mars rover Opportunity's microscopic imager onto a false-color image from the rover's panoramic camera. The combination shows locations of the microscopic imager's observations on a rock informally named "Tisdale 2."

Tisdale 2 was the first rock examined in detail by Opportunity following the rover's arrival at the rim of Endeavour crater. The rover made a series of observations by its microscopic imager and composition measurements by its alpha particle X-ray spectrometer from the top to the bottom of Tisdale 2. The rock is about 12 inches (30 centimeters) tall. The observation targets on it are designated by the informal name "Timmins 1" and by letters A through I.

Image Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech/Cornell/ASU/USGS/JHUAPL

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Rock 'Tisdale 2' on Endeavour Crater Rim (False Color)

This rock, informally named "Tisdale 2," was the first rock the NASA's Mars Rover Opportunity examined in detail on the rim of Endeavour crater. It has textures and composition unlike any rock the rover examined during its first 90 months on Mars. Its characteristics are consistent with the rock being a breccia -- a type of rock fusing together broken fragments of older rocks.

Tisdale 2 is about 12 inches (30 centimeters) tall. The black vertical line superimposed on the image indicates the work plane for Opportunity's robotic arm when the arm placed the rover's microscopic imager and alpha particle X-ray spectrometer at a series of locations from the top to the bottom of Tisdale 2.

Image Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech/Cornell/ASU

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Bright Veins in 'Botany Bay' on rim of Endeavour Crater on Mars
Bright Veins in 'Botany Bay' on rim of Endeavour Crater on Mars

Bright veins cutting across outcrop in a section of Endeavour crater's rim called "Botany Bay" are visible in the foreground and middle distance of this view assembled from images taken by the navigation camera on NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity during the rover's 2,681st Martian day, or sol, of working on Mars (Aug. 9, 2011).

The veins may have formed as minerals that had been dissolved in ground water came out of solution and were deposited.

A crater called "Odyssey," about 66 feet (20 meters) in diameter, is visible at upper right. It is on a low ridge called "Cape York," which forms part of the western rim of Endeavour crater, which is about 14 miles (22 kilometers) in diameter. Rocks ejected by the impact that dug Odyssey are scattered on the ground to the right of Odyssey. One of these rocks, "Tisdale 2," became the first rock that Opportunity examined in detail at Endeavour crater. The scale bar is 20 meters (66 feet).

Opportunity completed its three-month prime missions in April 2004 and has continued operations in bonus extended missions since then.

Image Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech

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Opportunity's View Across 'Botany Bay' and Endeavour on Sol 2678
Opportunity's View Across 'Botany Bay' and Endeavour on Sol 2678

NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity used its navigation camera during the rover's 2,678th Martian day, or sol, (Aug. 6, 2011) to record the image frames combined into this mosaic view centered toward the southeast.

The foreground area is a portion of an area called "Botany Bay" between two ridges forming part of the western rim of Endeavour crater. The bright blocks exposed on Botany are unusually rough and jagged, and observations from orbit imply the presence of relatively fresh outcrops of sulfate-rich materials.

Darker rocks on the left in the middle distance are around the edge of a small crater, "Odyssey," which is on the Endeavour crater rim fragment called "Cape York." Endeavour crater, with a diameter of 14 miles (22 kilometers) was chosen as Opportunity's long term destination in mid-2008, and the rover reached the crater's rim on Aug. 9, 2011. Distant ground in this view includes the floor and far rim of Endeavour.

Opportunity completed its three-month prime missions in April 2004 and has continued operations in bonus extended missions since then.

Image Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech

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Opportunity's First Neighborhood on Rim of Endeavour
Opportunity's First Neighborhood on Rim of Endeavour

This image taken from orbit shows the path driven by NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity in the weeks around the rover's arrival at the rim of Endeavour crater. The sol number (number of Martian days since the rover landed on Mars) are indicated along the route. Sol 2674 corresponds to Aug. 2, 2011; Sol 2688 corresponds to Aug. 16, 2011.

The route leads to a rock informally named "Tisdale 2," which is a block of material ejected by the excavation of a small crater called "Odyssey" on the Endeavour rim fragment called "Cape York." The next Endeavour rim fragment to the south is called "Sutherland Point," and a gap between Cape York and Sutherland Point is called "Botany Bay." The base image of the map is a portion of an image taken by the High Resolution Imaging Science Experiment (HiRISE) instrument on NASA's Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter, on July 23, 2010. Other image products from this observation are available at http://hirise.lpl.arizona.edu/ESP_018701_1775.

NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, a division of the California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, manages the Mars Exploration Rover Project and the Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter Project for the NASA Science Mission Directorate, Washington.The University of Arizona, Tucson, operates the HiRISE camera, which was built by Ball Aerospace & Technologies Corp., Boulder, Colo. Lockheed Martin Space Systems, Denver, is the spacecraft development and integration contractor for the project and built the spacecraft.

Image Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech/University of Arizona

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Opportunity Traverses Through 2,700 Martian Days
Opportunity Traverses Through 2,700 Martian Days

This map shows the 20.8-mile (33.5-kilometer) route driven by NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity from the site of its landing, inside Eagle crater at the upper left, to its location more than 91 months later, on the Cape York section of the rim of Endeavour crater.

The blue line covers traverses through the 2,700th Martian day, or sol, of Opportunity's work on Mars (Aug. 29, 2011). The base image for the map is a mosaic of images taken by the Context Camera on NASA's Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter. Endurance, Erebus, Victoria, and Santa Maria are craters examined by Opportunity. Block Island is an iron meteorite discovered during a traverse. The scale bar is 2 kilometers (1.24 miles).

Opportunity completed its three-month prime missions in April 2004 and has continued operations in bonus extended missions. The Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter reached Mars in 2006, completed its prime mission in 2010, and is also working in an extended mission. NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, a division of the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena, manages the Mars Exploration Rover Project and the Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter for the NASA Science Mission Directorate, Washington. Malin Space Science Systems, San Diego, built and operates the orbiter's Context Camera.

Image Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech/MSSS

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Opportunity at Work Examining 'Tisdale 2,' Sol 2695
Opportunity at Work Examining 'Tisdale 2,' Sol 2695

NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity used its front hazard-avoidance camera to take this picture showing the rover's arm extended toward a light-toned rock, "Tisdale 2," during the 2,695th Martian day, or sol, of the rover's work on Mars (Aug. 23, 2011). Tisdale 2 is about 12 inches (30 centimeters) tall.

The rover used two instruments on the robotic arm, the microscopic imager and the alpha particle X-ray spectrometer, to examine Tisdale 2. In this image, the turret at the end of the arm is positioned so that the microscopic imager is facing the rock.

Tisdale 2 and other rocks on the ground beyond it were apparently ejected by the impact that excavated a 66-foot-wide (20-meter-wide) crater, called "Odyssey," which is nearby to the left (north) of this scene. Odyssey and these rocks are on a low ridge called "Cape York," which is a segment of the western rim of Endeavour crater. Endeavour is about 14 miles (22 kilometers) in diameter. Portions of the interior and eastern rim of Endeavour are visible near the top of this image.

Image Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech

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Approaching 'Tisdale 2' Rock on Rim of Endeavour Crater, Sol 2690
Approaching 'Tisdale 2' Rock on Rim of Endeavour Crater, Sol 2690

NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity used its navigation camera to take this picture showing a light-toned rock, "Tisdale 2," during the 2,690th Martian day, or sol, of the rover's work on Mars (Aug. 18, 2011). The rock is about 12 inches (30 centimeters) tall.

In subsequent sols, the rover used tools on its robotic arm to examine Tisdale 2. That rock and others on the ground beyond it were apparently ejected by the impact that excavated a 66-foot-wide (20-meter-wide) crater, called "Odyssey," which is nearby to the left (north) of this scene. Odyssey and these rocks are on a low ridge called "Cape York," which is a segment of the western rim of Endeavour crater. Part of Opportunity's array of photovoltaic cells is visible in the foreground.

Image Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech

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